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Myrobalan: The Elixir of Life - A life-prolonging fruit of the Himalayas, by Udo Stanglmeier (2002)

$50.75

A biography of a threatened medicine tree of the Asian forests and its deep connection with central Buddhist medicine teachings, its history, mythology, pharmacology and latest scientific research results along with ancient Ayurveda source translations and advices on today’s applicability. Hardbound book with natural grass rope and 3 real dry myrobalan fruits. The book contains more than 45 related pictures, facsimiles of old texts, scientific data - ethnological knowledge of different Asian nations and their mythological inter-connections revolving around this special botanic species with cosmic symbolic importance.

All profits from the sale of this book will go towards reforestation of the many different wild forms of heirloom haritaki trees.

Description

A biography of a threatened medicine tree of the Asian forests and its deep connection with central Buddhist medicine teachings, its history, mythology, pharmacology and latest scientific research results along with ancient Ayurveda source translations and advices on today’s applicability. Hardbound book with natural grass rope and 3 real dry myrobalan fruits. The book contains more than 45 related pictures, facsimiles of old texts, scientific data - ethnological knowledge of different Asian nations and their mythological inter-connections revolving around this special botanic species with cosmic symbolic importance.

Arura (spoken 'Aroora')   - Myrobalan is the Tibetan name for a fruit growing on a wild tree belonging to the Terminalia plant family. This is an extensive botanical group of trees that is specially adapted to the different variations of subtropical Asian mountain climate.

Arura is the Tibetan name of a stone fruit that was known in Europe under the name Kabul-Myrobalan more than 500 years ago. At that time it was one of the most important imported spices from the Orient. But the fruit has been used in Asia as a natural dietary supplement and tonic for thousands of years.

Examined using modern analytical methods, Arura reveals as a source of high-quality vegetable protein, rare vitamins, minerals and trace elements - a kind of naturally grown "vitamin pill" - an unusually concentrated source for fruits. Although the fruit is of outstanding importance for Asian medicine, the last wild locations are in acute danger due to human cultural expansion.

The author of this book promotes and works for the protection of the last intact locations of this now rare forest tree with its numerous variants. They have also tried the difficult reforestation of the many different wild forms for a decade. The Arura fruit, although little known, is the most important "panacea" in Tibetan medicine and Indian Ayurveda. It is the basic substance in almost all Ayurvedic formulas and Tibetan pills.

According to the legends, Arura was created from the divine nectar of immortality, which accidentally fell to the earth and gave birth to this tree. Arura-Myrobalan is regarded in Asia as fulfilling wishes and bringing happiness. In ancient Tibetan texts, the fruit is referred to as the "Queen of Remedies".

According to ancient texts, a single fruit a day is enough to live a healthy hundred years.

That Myrobalan is something very special can be seen from a special depiction of the Buddha, who is holding the branch of the tree or its fruit in his right hand. This representation is called the "Medicine Buddha". With the gesture of giving he presents the "highest medicine", the only natural substance that has the ability to prevent all natural diseases through preventive use.


Haritaki trees


Haritaki fruit





Review from a Reader

"This book, composed by the German author Udo Stanglmeier is an extremely comprehensive and well-researched insight into the history of making use of Haritaki through the Buddhist lineage, especially the connection in between the Medicine Buddha and Haritaki...

His material, likewise, looks at the ancient documentation about Haritaki in India, China and South East Asia. He reveals the interlinking of the misconceptions and teachings from custom to tradition, and determines the underlying themes that are present through all.

Stanglmeier begins the book with the misconceptions relating to the Amrita or Nectar of the gods that are discovered in Vedic literature from the Hindu tradition, and comparable stories from Buddhism.

The book then enters into fantastic depth about the Buddhist use of Haritaki and its mythological properties. He points out that in Tibet Haritaki was utilized in almost all medications as one of the components. Because of the remoteness and lack of trees in Tibet the typical methods herbal medicines were made and administered was in big pill type. Haritaki is not typical in Tibet therefore the Haritaki powder would be carried from India into Tibet for usage in the pills.

Stanglmeier describes in the book the significance of Haritaki in the modern-day context. He points out that more scientists are finding that there is a deeper importance to using a lot of the standard herbs. He describes that the ancient seers discovered many more benefits than the modern clinical method reveals."



ISBN 13: 978-3934086036
ISBN 10: 3934086039